Pharaoh and Uniformity in Egyptian Art.

The uniformity of Egyptian Art had also political basis. Pharaoh and Uniformity in Egyptian Art. In the state sphere, the Egyptian society required a balance, which depended directly on Pharaoh. The Egyptian monarchy was an institution with double nature, divine and human. The sovereign, by his superhuman essence, was the one who mediated between the […]

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Reading the Egyptian Art (II).

Artists and theologist of Ancient Egypt worked together in the emergence of iconographies and they combined different planes of meaning: images and words. That is why reading the Egyptian art requires an iconographic and textual analysis. The Egyptian art: a language of signs. The Egyptian art is a language of signs and just like the Egyptian language, […]

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Reading the Egyptian Art (I).

Egyptian art had a magical-functional purpose and did not take into consideration the figure of the spectator. For that reason, we cannot consider Egyptian art from just an aesthetic empiricism. Which makes art feel in a subjective way through sensations. We must read the Egyptian Art from the technical realization, but also from its ideological-religious […]

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Ancient Egyptian Funerary Environment in the Treasury of Tutankhamun.

The tomb of Tutankhamun needs to be seen as an historical document. Nowadays everyone knows about Tutankhamun. His mummy, his funeral mask, his golden sarcophagus, his jewels, his spectacular furniture … are familiar to anyone.  But this familiarity towards the figure of Tutankhamun and his tomb does not always mean true knowledge. The Tomb of […]

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A lament in Amarna made by common mourners.

Iconography proofs the existence of a mourning practice in Amarna. Specially relevant is the Royal Tomb, where the funeral of Meketaten, the royal daughter, was depicted. The death of Meketaten was lamented by the royal family, that is Akhenaten, Nefertiti and the three sisters, Meritaton, Ankhesenpaaton and Neferferuaton-ta-sherit, but also by a group of mourners. These scenes of lament […]

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An Ancient Egyptian Mourning Ritual Took Place in Amarna.

In Ancient Egypt the afterlife and the eternity were concepts very inserted into belief. The funerary art granted food, drink, furniture, religious cult…The mourning rite depicted was also crucial for the dead’s resurrection. During the reign of Akhenaten, iconography coming from tombs of Amarna show mainly scenes of the “living ones”: Sculptors in the workshop, worship […]

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In Ancient Egypt were Isis and Nephthys Essential in Cartonnages.

Cartonnages in Ancient Egypt were used over the wrapped mummy mainly for mummy masks and some important parts of the body. The cartonnage of Irtirutja in the Metropolitan Museum of Art of New York dates from the Ptolemaic period. In it one can see how the artist of Ancient Egypt dedicated this technique for covering some special parts of the mummy. […]

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The Dead: An Observer in the Egyptian Art.

Perspective in Egyptian art was special. For us, perspective is the representation on a flat surface of reality how it is seen by human eye. That means that observer is an important element when the artists paints or draw something. In Egyptian art the artists had to represent reality, not how it was seen, but how it was.  The Egyptian artisan did not think about depth or […]

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Serket: scorpion and waterscorpion in Ancient Egypt.

The goddess Serket was associated in Ancient Egypt to the scorpion and to the waterscorpion. Scholars have usually cosidered the ancient Egyptian goddess Serket as a goddess scorpion, whose harmful bite made her an effective protection against poisonous stings. Not for nothing, Serket is invoked in many remedies against scorpions bites. But the animal in the […]

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The Beauty of Hair in Ancient Egypt.

Hair has been from ancient times an important element for preserving a good- looking. Recently in the blog Studia Humanitatis it was published a very interesting post about how the concept of a woman’s beauty is closely related to hair. He mentioned a passage of The Metamorphoses of Lucius Apuleius, in which he falls in […]

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Hair in Egyptian Art for Expressing Respect.

Hair became in Ancient Egypt a resource for expressing things. The bending hair was used in Ancient Egypt art for drawing body movements. As some movements were related in Ancient Egyptian belief to some attitudes, hair was also used for expressing those attitudes. We are referring concretly to “respect”. The gesture of bending the body forwards was […]

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Hair in the Art of Ancient Egypt for expressing Dance.

Due to the estrict rules of the Egyptian art, artists in Ancient Egypt needed to find unnatural ways of expressing some movements, especially during the Old and Middle Kingdom. Distorsion and sprain characterises dynamic scenes (dancing, acrobaces, games…) in those periods of Egyptian history. However, from the New Kingdom dynamism appears in Ancient Egypt decoration […]

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